Maritime

The IMO adopts greenhouse gas reduction strategy

The IMO’s vision is to phase out greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as soon as possible within the end of this century. The aim is to reduce total emissions from shipping by 50% in 2050, and to reduce the average carbon intensity by 40% in 2030 and 70% in 2050, compared to 2008.

TecReg - greenhouse gas reduction strategy

Relevant for ship owners and managers, shipyards, design offices, suppliers and flag states.

On 13 April 2018, the IMO adopted a strategy to reduce GHG emissions from shipping. The strategy is the first step of a roadmap adopted by the IMO to address GHG emissions in shipping.

Ambitious targets

The 50% emission reduction is ambitious, and will likely call for widespread uptake of zero-carbon fuels, in addition to other energy efficiency measures. These fuels are not available today, and there needs to be a consorted effort towards developing such fuels and making them available in the necessary quantity. At the same time, all other industries and nations are expected to contribute to reducing GHG emissions. This will both complement the efforts in the shipping industry, but at the same time there will be competition for the zero-carbon fuels.

Possible policy measures

The strategy contains a long list of possible measures that the IMO can implement, both regulatory measures and supporting measures. The IMO’s next step will be to prioritize and decide on which measures to follow up and to develop an action plan. 

Some of the measures under consideration are:

Short term (until 2023):

  • Review and strengthen EEDI, including new phases
  • Develop operational indicators
  • Speed reduction/optimization
  • National Action Plans (domestic measures, decided independently by countries)
  • Life cycle GHG/carbon intensity guidelines for fuels

Medium term (2023 to 2030):

  • New reduction mechanism, possibly including operational indicators
  • Market-based measures
  • Implementation programme for low-carbon fuels

Long term (2030 onwards):

  • Development and provision of zero-carbon fuels
  • Other innovative reduction mechanisms

Next steps

This is an initial strategy, and according to the roadmap there will a review in 5 years, based on the results from the Data Collection System and a 4th IMO GHG study to be undertaken in 2019. A programme for follow-up actions of the strategy will be discussed at the IMO in a working group meeting, likely in September, and at MEPC 73 in October, 2018.

Recommendations

This will not impact existing ships in the short term, but over time requirements are expected to apply for both new designs and existing ships. Ship owners and builders are recommended to monitor and explore energy efficiency and alternative low-carbon fuel options.

References

10 June 2022

IMO update: Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 78)

The 78th session of the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 78) was held remotely from 6 to 10 June 2022. Highlights included the finalization of technical guidelines for the upcoming EEXI, CII and SEEMP regulations; approval of a proposal for a sulphur emission control area (SECA) in the Mediterranean Sea; and further discussions on the revision of the IMO GHG Strategy scheduled for 2023, and future technical and market-based measures.

  • Maritime
29 April 2022

IMO maritime safety committee (MSC 105)

The 105th session of the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) was held remotely from 20 to 29 April. A wide range of topics was on the agenda, including the safety of ships carrying industrial personnel, the safety of ships relating to the use of fuel oil, and the consideration of a regulatory framework for maritime autonomous surface ships. Requirements reflecting modern systems for maritime distress and safety communication were adopted and interim guidelines for the safety of ships using fuel cell power installations were approved. The development of interim guidelines for ships using ammonia as fuel were initiated.

  • Maritime
11 April 2022

IMO sub-committee on pollution prevention and response (PPR9)

The 9th session of the IMO’s Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR 9) was held remotely from 4 to 8 April 2022. A wide range of topics was on the agenda, including biofouling, ballast water management, black carbon, sewage treatment and marine plastic litter. PPR agreed on draft guidelines on risk and impact assessments of the discharge water from exhaust gas cleaning systems when considering local or regional regulations.

  • Maritime
24 March 2022

SEEMP Part III and the upcoming SEEMP Generator from DNV

Since 2019 ships of 5,000 GT and above have been reporting their fuel oil consumption data mandated by the IMO DCS. From 2023, cargo, cruise and RoPax ships must calculate CII with a required rating of C or better. This means some ships will have to improve their carbon intensity. A verified Ship Operational Carbon Intensity Plan, or SEEMP Part III, is to be kept on board from 1 January 2023 to document how you plan to achieve your CII targets. This statutory news provides an update on the SEEMP Part III and recommends next steps.

  • Maritime
View all