Maros and Taro: Unmatched tradition

Chemical process software from DNV GL - Taro

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Maros and Taro: Unmatched tradition!

Maros and Taro have an extensive background which goes back to at least 30 years. The tools have evolved vastly since the first release but this history shows how powerful these tools are.

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Maros and Taro development Timeline

The history of key releases of both software packages throughout the years is shown below:

  • 1983 – Maros 1 release
  • Iain Jardine produces a discrete event based simulation tool initially for the oil and gas industry for DOS and UNIX operating systems.
  • 1985 – Maros 2 released
  • 1987 – Maros 3 released
  • 1989 – Maros 4 released
  • 1992 – Margui 1 release
  • A graphical Maros model text input file generator with an automatic Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) print/display facility.
  • 1996 – Maros 5 released
  • A number of functionalities and feature improvements. Margui, the model text file generator for Maros, now closely integrated with the simulator. This provided the ability to run models directly from the user interface instead of generating the input file and running the simulator separately.
  • 1996 – Trail 1 released
  • Based on Maros simulation engine technology Trail allows the modeller to assess the impact of failures and maintenance on timetabled rail services. The timetable can them be evaluated in non-idealised rail system and changes to the timetable or improvements to reliability and maintainability can be considered.
  • 1998 – Maros 6 released
  • Maros version 6 was a complete rewrite of the user interface as a 32 bit interface comply fully with Windows 95 and future operating systems. Major improvements to displaying assets, and graphical and tabular results resources. A new explorer type navigation feature. Seamless integration with the simulation engine.
  • 1998 – Taro (Oil & Gas) 3 released
  • Previously only available internally, Taro (Oil & Gas) provides a Maros simulation technology with enhanced maintenance resource modelling.
  • 2000 – ACE 1 released
  • ACE encapsulates the core functionality of Maros and acts as a low cost entry point for Maros simulation technology.
  • 2000 – Taro (Refinery & Petro Chem) Internal Only
  • Based on Maros simulation technology with Taro maintenance enhancements, Taro (Refinery & Petro Chem) added blend management and other features familiar to the Refinery & Petrochemical market.
  • New multi-product flow and blending algorithms developed for downstream Oil & Gas industry with potential for other energy sectors. The first version of Taro (Refinery and Petro Chem) included enhanced maintenance and logistics. This tool replaced Taro Oil & Gas.
  • 2002 – Maros 7 / ACE 7 released
  • Complex branch transient interface replaced with a simple, spreadsheet type flow grid data entry method. Improved flaring modelling and results. Maros version 7 had the ability to handle multiple products i.e. gas, oil and water. There was also a new facility providing a means of evaluating gas shortfall assignment schemes, if you are aware of the contract recovery period you know what we are talking about here. ACE was brought into line with Maros.

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Maros version 7

  • 2002 – Taro (Refinery & Petro Chem) 1 release
  • 2003 – Taro (Defence) 1 release
  • This version of Taro targeted the military market (birth of RAM analysis). This version was focusing on defence logistics and supply chain modelling based on Taro’s event and maintenance resource management engine.
  • 2004 – Taro (Refinery & Petro Chem) 2 release
  • 2004 – Trail release
  • This version of Trail implemented a signal-to-signal train separation and management instead of safe distance.
  • Primarily service rerouting based on scheduled work or unscheduled failures, Dynamic allocation of engineering allowance, train movements animation on a journey by journey basis, and improved service logs.
  • 2005 – Taro (Refinery & Petro Chem) 3 release
  • 2006 – Maros 8
  • Maros 8 incorporates improved maintenance resource handling as well as further improvements to the interface and simulator. Major revamp to the Results Presentation with Results Viewer
  • 2008 – Taro (Refinery & Petro Chem) 4 release
  • New tables, views and usability enhancements
  • New shipping, storage modelling and flow network capabilities
  • 2009 – Integrated simulation engine
  • In 2009, we kicked off a project to integrate Maros and Taro under the same simulation engine. The idea was to provide unique simulation engine targeted to model both upstream, midstream and downstream and combining Maros and Taro functionality
  • 2010 – Maros Lite 8.4
  • Entry level tool to replace ACE. Maros Lite includes a simplistic flow modelling approach in addition extensive maintenance modelling and lifecycle cost analysis.
  • 2014 – The fantastic Maros 9 and Taro 5
  • This first phase of an architecture upgrade of our simulation engine puts the RAM analyst at the centre of the performance forecasting analysis. Clients’ requests from all over the world have driven the development of our RAM analysis software.
  • Maros and Taro now share the same simulation engine which will make support and maintenance easy
  • Features can be easily be transferred from each application
  • Maros will benefit from Taro’s advanced features and Taro will benefits from Maros’ user-friendliness.

Plant - Maros and Taro: Unmatched tradition - animation

Full supply chain

Having pioneered the use of simulation processes in much of the offshore energy business for many years, it is not our intention to rest on our laurels. Digital Solutions at DNV will continue to implement a detailed R&D innovations program aimed at maintaining our leading edge in the provision of sophisticated software solutions to our clients.

Author: Victor Borges

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