Maritime

DNV RU-NAV provides common entry point for naval rules

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DNV RU-NAV provides common entry point for naval rules

To better meet the needs of navies and naval shipbuilders, DNV has implemented the following steps:

  1. The rule book RU-NAV has been introduced as a common entry point to the three rule books with naval content (RU-NAVAL, RU-SHIP and RU-HSLC). RU-NAV will be the most up-to-date ruleset that DNV has ever provided for navy ships when it is fully released, and the natural choice for clients building navy vessels based on a classification concept.
  2. A new service description SE-0555 will be published to describe DNV’s Naval Technical Assurance, a new approach to the complete naval assurance process as an alternative to classification.

RU-NAV

In October 2020, DNV published RU-NAV Part 1, with Chapters 1 and 2 describing the Naval Classification concept. All class notations and additional notations can now be found in Chapter 2 with the reference point to the respective rule book per class notation and additional notation.

Additional chapters to RU-NAV will be published on a rolling basis over the next two years. As each is published, it will supersede the respective part of RU-NAVAL, RU-SHIP and RU-HSLC. RU-NAV Part 2 “Materials and Welding”, and Part 7 “Fleet in service”, are due in July 2021. While July 2022 is the planned publication date for Part 3 “Hull”, Part 4 “System and components”, Part 5 “Ship types”, Part 6 “Additional class notation”, and Part 8 “Submarines”.

The current rule book RU-NAVAL will then be replaced, as all content will be transferred into RU-NAV. RU-SHIP and RU-HSLC will then have no more reference to naval content. However, there shall be references to requirements in RU-SHIP and RU-HSLC from RU-NAV according to specific or additional class notations.

The structural requirements (RU-NAVAL Pt3 Ch1- Hull) are valid and are implemented in our rule calculation tool Nauticus Rules which can be used on a stand-alone basis for spot checks of simple components or parts. This calculation tool is part of the implementation of the ship type naval in Naticus Hull (NH20), our structural assessment tool. Publication of Nauticus Rules is planed with the NH20 release in July 2021.

Service description SE-0555 Naval Services (DNV Naval Technical Assurance)

SE-0555 will describe DNV Naval Technical Assurance, a new approach to the complete assurance process with respect to material safety, not limited to the conventional understanding of classification. DNV Naval Technical Assurance has been developed using classification principles and processes to support verification across a wide range of regulatory schemes:

  • National legislation and/or regulatory systems
  • Proprietary navy regulatory systems
  • Regulatory systems that rely on class services
  • Regulatory systems that apply the ANEP-77 Naval Ship Code

In summary, RU-NAV is now the common entry point to RU-NAVAL, RU-SHIP and RU-HSLC. It provides the flexibility to engage with both existing and future technical assurance safety frameworks. Once the revision of the rules for naval vessels has been completed, all technical content including the service description SE-0555 will be in RU-NAV.

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